Automata Empire - Le Bottin des Jeux Linux

Automata Empire

🗃️ Specifications

📰 Title: Automata Empire 🕹️ / 🛠️ Type: Game
🗃️ Genre: Strategy 🚦 Status: 05. Released
🏷️ Category: Strategy ➤ Top-Down Fight of Units ➤ Misc. 🌍️ Browser-based:
🔖 Tags: Strategy; Conquest; Military; Casual; Funny; Cute; Short; Online Multi 📦️ Package Name:
🐣️ Approx. start: 📦️ Arch:
🐤️ Latest: 🍥️ On Deb repo:
📍️ Version: Latest : - 📦️ Deb:
🏛️ License type: Commercial 📦️ RPM:
🏛️ License: Commercial 📦️ AppImage:
🏝️ Perspective: Third person 📦️ Snap:
👁️ Visual: 2.5D 📦️ Flatpak/Athenaeum:
⏱️ Pacing: Real Time ⚙️ Generic bin.:
👫️ Played: Single & Multi 📄️ Source:
🎖️ This record: 5 stars 📱️ PDA support:
🎖️ Game design: 👫️ Contrib.: Goupil & Louis
🎰️ ID: 15000 🐛️ Created: 2016-05-26
🐜️ Updated: 2021-11-07

📖️ Summary

[fr]: Un jeu de stratégie inspiré du Jeu de la vie de John Horton Conway : le joueur mène (indirectement) des centaines d'automates écervelés pour écraser les châteaux de ses rivaux et s'emparer de leur territoire. Il pourra sacrifier ses sbires ou les lancer dans la bataille via des catapultes, en veillant à équilibrer soigneusement expansion et consolidation pour développer son empire en territoire ennemi et obtenir une position dominante. [en]: Inspired by Conway’s Game of Life, it challenges you to herd hundreds of mindless automata to smash your rivals’ castles and steal their territory. While your subjects lack intelligence, you can sacrifice them to build chains of taverns and roads to impose order on chaos. Ready to invade? Build some high-velocity catapults to launch your minions directly into battle. Balance expansion & consolidation carefully to grow your empire into enemy territory. Or cleverly engineer feedback loops to surprise your opponents with overwhelming force.

🎥️ Videos

🎥️ Trailer : (202xxx),


🕹️ Gameplay : (202xxx), (202xxx), (202xxx),


🐧 Linux joue / Linux plays : Gaming On Linux (202xxx),

🕸️ Links

🏡️ Website & videos
[Homepage] [Dev site] [Features/About] [Screenshots] [Videos t(202xxx) ts(202xxx) gd(202xxx) r(202xxx) lp(202xxx) g(202xxx) g(202xxx) g[fr](202xxx) g[de](202xxx)] [WIKI] [FAQ] [RSS] [Changelog 1 2 3]

💵 Commercial : [Humble Store] [Itch.io] [Steam]

🍩️ Resources
(empty) :
🛠️ Technical informations
[Open Hub] [PCGamingWiki] [MobyGames]

🐘 Social
Devs (Nonadecimal Creative [fr] [en]) : [Site 1 2] [twitter] [YouTube] [LinkedIn] [PressKit] [Interview 1 2]
Game : [Blog] [Forums] [twitter] [YouTube] [PressKit]

🐝️ Related
[Wikipedia (Jeu de la vie) [fr] (Conway's Game of Life) [en]]

📦️ Misc. repositories


🕵️ Reviews
[metacritic] [Gaming on Linux (20160525)]

📰 News / Source of this Entry (SotE) / News (SotN)
[Gaming on Linux (20160525)]

🐘 Social Networking Update (on Mastodon)

🕹️ Title:
🦊️ What's:
🏡️
🐣️
🔖 #linux

🐧 Update:
💼️
📌️ Changes:
📖 Our entry: https://bit.ly/bottinLightOn
🐘 From:
🏝️ http://youtu.be/
🕵️ http://youtu.be/
🕹️ http://youtu.be/
🐧 http://youtu.be/

Source of this Entry:

📕 Description [fr]

Un jeu de stratégie inspiré du Jeu de la vie de Conway, par le studio Nonadecimal Creative.

Automata Empire est un jeu de stratégie inspiré du Jeu de la vie de John Horton Conway : le joueur mène (indirectement) des centaines d'automates écervelés pour écraser les châteaux de ses rivaux et s'emparer de leur territoire. Il pourra sacrifier ses sbires ou les lancer dans la bataille via des catapultes, en veillant à équilibrer soigneusement expansion et consolidation pour développer son empire en territoire ennemi et obtenir une position dominante.


Inspiré par le Jeu de la vie de John Horton Conway, Automates Empire vous défie de mener des centaines d'automates écervelés pour écraser les châteaux de vos rivaux et vous emparer de leur territoire. Bien que vos fidèles sujets manquent d'intelligence individuelle, vous pouvez les sacrifier pour construire des chaînes de tavernes et de routes pour imposer l'ordre sur le chaos. Prêt à envahir ? Construisez quelques catapultes à haute vélocité pour lancer vos sbires directement dans la bataille. Veillez à équilibrer soigneusement expansion et consolidation pour développer votre empire en territoire ennemi et obtenir une position dominante sur le tore. Ou en fin stratège élaborez des boucles de rétroaction pour surprendre vos adversaires par une force écrasante.


🌍️ Wikipedia (Jeu de la vie) :

Le jeu de la vie est un automate cellulaire imaginé par John Horton Conway en 1970 qui est probablement, au début du XXIe siècle, le plus connu de tous les automates cellulaires.
Malgré des règles très simples, le jeu de la vie est Turing-complet.

Règles

En préambule, il faut préciser que le jeu de la vie n’est pas vraiment un jeu au sens ludique, puisqu’il ne nécessite aucun joueur ; il s’agit d’un automate cellulaire, un modèle où chaque état conduit mécaniquement à l’état suivant à partir de règles pré-établies.

Le jeu se déroule sur une grille à deux dimensions, théoriquement infinie (mais de longueur et de largeur finies et plus ou moins grandes dans la pratique), dont les cases — qu’on appelle des « cellules », par analogie avec les cellules vivantes — peuvent prendre deux états distincts : « vivantes » ou « mortes ».

À chaque étape, l’évolution d’une cellule est entièrement déterminée par l’état de ses huit voisines de la façon suivante :

• Une cellule morte possédant exactement trois voisines vivantes devient vivante (elle naît).
• Une cellule vivante possédant deux ou trois voisines vivantes le reste, sinon elle meurt.

Ainsi, la configuration Gol-blinker1.png donne au tour suivant la configuration Gol-blinker2.png qui redonne ensuite la première.

On peut également formuler cette évolution ainsi :

• Si une cellule a exactement trois voisines vivantes, elle est vivante à l’étape suivante.
• Si une cellule a exactement deux voisines vivantes, elle reste dans son état actuel à l’étape suivante.
• Si une cellule a strictement moins de deux ou strictement plus de trois voisines vivantes, elle est morte à l’étape suivante.

📕 Description [en]

Inspired by Conway’s Game of Life, Automata Empire challenges you to herd hundreds of mindless automata to smash your rivals’ castles and steal their territory. While your loyal subjects lack individual intelligence, you can sacrifice them to build chains of taverns and roads to impose order on chaos. Ready to invade? Build some high-velocity catapults to launch your minions directly into battle. Balance expansion and consolidation carefully to grow your empire into enemy territory and gain dominance over the toroid. Or cleverly engineer feedback loops to surprise your opponents with overwhelming force.

Background

When I was a kid, I played a version of Conway’s Game of Life on my first Windows 95 computer. It was nothing like the other games I’d played; I was perplexed by its lack of stated objectives or win conditions. With each attempt to achieve some greater understanding of the game, I was confronted by the lack of any metrics to tell me if I was doing better or worse than I had before. This was very troubling to me as a child, watching the cellular populations burble around the grid only to suffer yet another extinction. When I was challenged to make a “growth”-themed game for the Indie Game Maker Contest 2015 game jam, I rediscovered those frustrating memories and set out to make an objective-based cellular automata game. While I ultimately abandoned Conway’s binary alive/dead cellular rules in favor of additive numerical values, the themes of struggling to engineer sustainable populations and useful oscillators remain.

In the process, I discovered a new gameplay mechanic: feedback loops. With the cellular reproduction tied to the automata’s numerical values, the challenge becomes herding the automata into positive feedback loops where each +1 increase in population feeds back into further increases in population. In the right conditions, this process is no longer a linear increase but an explosive growth. Feedback loops are important to understand because many of the global threats to our species today are driven by feedback loops. For instance, melting arctic ice both releases pockets of methane gas trapped under the ice (which contributes to the greenhouse effect) and exposes darker ground that absorbs more heat (raising the surface albedo). Both of these outcomes contribute to rising surface temperatures, thereby increasing the rate at which the ice melts (the positive feedback loop), which again causes an acceleration of warming. Feedback loops are inherent not just to climate change, but also the migration of invasive species, ecosystem collapse, and the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. I hope seeing this process in action in Automata Empire inspires people to learn more about the underlying principles of positive and negative feedback loops and how they affect our daily lives and our future.



🌍️ Wikipedia (Conway's Game of Life) :

The Game of Life, also known simply as Life, is a cellular automaton devised by the British mathematician John Horton Conway in 1970.[1]

The "game" is a zero-player game, meaning that its evolution is determined by its initial state, requiring no further input. One interacts with the Game of Life by creating an initial configuration and observing how it evolves, or, for advanced "players", by creating patterns with particular properties.

Rules

The universe of the Game of Life is an infinite two-dimensional orthogonal grid of square cells, each of which is in one of two possible states, alive or dead. Every cell interacts with its eight neighbours, which are the cells that are horizontally, vertically, or diagonally adjacent. At each step in time, the following transitions occur:

• Any live cell with fewer than two live neighbours dies, as if caused by under-population.
• Any live cell with two or three live neighbours lives on to the next generation.
• Any live cell with more than three live neighbours dies, as if by over-population.
• Any dead cell with exactly three live neighbours becomes a live cell, as if by reproduction.


The initial pattern constitutes the seed of the system. The first generation is created by applying the above rules simultaneously to every cell in the seed—births and deaths occur simultaneously, and the discrete moment at which this happens is sometimes called a tick (in other words, each generation is a pure function of the preceding one). The rules continue to be applied repeatedly to create further generations.